Music Publishing Administration

On the entertainment side of our practice, the primary focus is administration of music publishing and master recording catalogs. Because of attorney Tamera Bennett’s extensive background in music publishing and specifically in working with the 1909 Copyright Act, we focus this practice on “estate” catalogs.  The firm is located in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex, but we work with clients in Texas and Tennessee.

Typically we work with the surviving heir or heirs to a music publishing catalog or master catalog.   Depending on the need of the client, we may be the point person for any and all licensing issues for mechanical, synchronization, print or other licenses, as well as investigating possible unlicensed uses, i.e., infringements. For songs written before January 1, 1978 we also work closely with the client to terminate grants made under the 1909 copyright act and reclaim works for the heirs. We may also work with the client to investigate other revenue sources for the songs/masters in the catalog through song placement.

Entertainment Lawyer Tamera Bennett has a real passion for educating folks on how the music publishing business works and how to protect their creative endeavors. Her article, “2003 = The New Millennium for Copyright” on the topic of termination of transfers under the 1909 and 1976 Copyright Acts has been published in four resources: the materials for the 2003 and 2004 Legal & Business Aspects of the Film & Music Industries CLE; teaching materials for the UCLA Music Business course; and the September 2003 California Copyright Conference Newsletter. In October 2006 she was honored to make a joint presentation with attorneys Kenneth W. Pajak and Katherine A. Kinser on “The Intersection of Estate Issues and Copyright Law: A Long and Winding Road.”


7 responses to “Music Publishing Administration

  • Janie Behr

    I am visually disabled and just finished writing my first book. I would love to use the first four lines in the song que sera sera.

    How do I go about getting permission.
    thank you

  • Doug Gray

    You have to contact the publisher…try the publishers below…it’s a start:
    ———————————————————–
    Que Sera, Sera (Whatever Will Be, Will Be)”
    Music by Jay Livingston
    Lyrics by Ray Evans
    Published 1956
    Original artist Doris Day
    Recorded by many artists;
    ——————————————————–
    QUE SERA SERA ASACAP:470324273
    Writers:
    BERTHIAUME JOCELYNE
    EVANS RAYMOND B
    LIVINGSTON JAY

    Publishers/Administrators:
    JAY LIVINGSTON MUSIC INC
    ATTN: RANDY TALMADGE
    45-495 OSAGE COURT
    INDIAN WELLS , CA, 92210
    Tel. (760) 674-4967

    ST ANGELO MUSIC
    % UNIVERSAL MUSIC CORPORATION
    2440 SEPULVEDA BLVD.
    SUITE 100
    LOS ANGELES , CA, 90064
    Tel. (310) 235-4700

  • Susan D. Jacobs

    I have personally created a story for an musical with some portion of some of the songs done. I also have a name and logo. Do I first trademark my musical name/look?

  • Eric Gichira

    Hallo,
    I am an upcoming lyricist in Nairobi , Kenya.
    I have many lyrics that i’ve written and would like
    to know if Music Publishers in US are open to publishing
    or copyrighting lyrics only.
    Also how can i copyright my lyrics to curb against
    exploitation. Thank you for your time,
    Eric G

  • Rhonda Constantin

    I have a film student who would like to use the melody of “Que sera sera” played on a store bought wind-up music box for the soundtrack of her short film. The film will have no commercial value, will only be shown in private screenings and short film festivals if selected. How does she go about requesting usage rights? Thank you.

  • ipandentertainmentlaw

    Rhonda, the best place to start is the music publisher and request a film festival license. Tracking down the master owner may be more difficult.

  • Johnnie Bennett

    My daughter wrote two songs with melody and chords for one. I hired a beat maker to come in and lay some tracks with lyrics and melody. Hired a vocalist for one of the songs. Both songs were DEMOS. Beat maker and vocalist are trying to get royalties. How should this go?

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